Poetic Resistance to the Berkeley Sitting Ban

Poets held a poetry reading to challenge the City Council’s proposed sitting ban. How delightful it would be if we could just sing our way right past this terrible proposal to outlaw something as natural as sitting down. We should pour enough poetry on it that it is doused entirely.

Poetry, May 2011

The Hungriest People / Song by Carol Denney/ the hungriest people in this town/ aren’t starving in the street/ they sit in fancy restaurants/ and worry what to eat/ the poorest people in this town/ without a single doubt/ conspire at boardroom tables/ how to drive poor people out/

A Nonviolent Path to Peace in the Holy Land

Increasing numbers of Palestinians and thousands of Israelis see nonviolent action as an effective way to challenge the Israeli military occupation. This excellent book encourages all of us to get beyond the all-too-common division of the world between “us” and “them,” and the need to resort to war and killing as a way of solving problems and achieving security.

Poetry, April 2011

LENT 2011 (Spring Renewal) by Maureen Hartmann This year there have been uprisings of the grassroots against oppressive governments, like Wisconsin, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia. The protests are signs of a growth in consciousness. A maturation, like a small amount of yeast in dough for a large loaf, spreads throughout the Earth. This year the grassroots implant, even in many deaths, seeds of hope and renewal.

In His Steps

Story by Joan Clair “The single criterion for judgment offered by Jesus in his account of the world’s final judgment

Poetry, November 2010

Who Would Believe by Claire J. Baker Who would believe that all week at a slick Senior Center in a

Short Fiction: The Greek Couple; Turn and Burn

The Greek Couple— Fiction by George Wynn When Tito came back home to Boston, where his father and mother were dead, he’d always screw up. Nostalgia for his parents drove him to the bottle. He was persona non grata with his two married sisters on the South Shore. /—/Turn and Burn— Fiction by Joan Clair “You need to think of it as a business,” one of the property managers said. “It’s not about his humanity or yours, even though, of course, none of us likes to put anyone out on the street.”